Episode – 12 How BBQ Saves American Music’s Heritage

America’s roots music preservation begins with a screen door slam, a beer and a plate of BBQ.

Aubrey Preston’s one-man mission to save America’s music culture, its historic buildings, shacks and stories is an international movement to provide an accurate guide for visitors from foreign lands. .. searchers from the British Isles, France or Sweden on their own Music Path.

Now reaching around the world on the web, www.americanamusictriangle.com provides hype-free, authentic exposure for people and places you’d never hear of, with a significant role in America’s music. That means fewer French Canadians lost, looking for Sonny Boy Williamson’s grave or that couple from Copenhagen, finds Clarksdale, Mississippi more easily. It’s organically grown, grass roots tourism. Aubrey tells us a world history from a magic place, a triangle with a driving beat, heard around the world.

Episode 11 – Deborah Allen – Memphis Girl


Deborah Allen is a Memphis Girl who woke up one morning in Elvis’s bed with a dream to write and perform music, and then lived that dream.

With major record deals she wrote and recorded in Nashville, New York and Los Angeles. She tells us what inspired a few of her songs and the advice she got along the way. She lives in Nashville, surrounded by friends, writers and performers.

She’s married to Raymond Hicks.

Deborah has an active following on social media:

www.deborahallen.com

Facebook.com/DeborahAllenOfficial

@DeborahAllen3 on twitter and Instagram

DeborahAllen in LinkedIn

 

Episode 9 – Puckett’s Makes Music

 

Andy Marshall built a business from Tennessee’s most precious natural resource.  A story of a grocery that became a restaurant that became an important music venue.

His affinity for songwriters and performers and their opportunity to engage and connect with their audience, at Puckett’s Grocery, is magic!

You hear the story behind the song, but even better, you meet the writer/performer up close and personal… with great food and drink.

Episode 8 – Waylon Jennings “Never Say Die”

Richie Albright tells us about meeting, playing and sharing a musical ride with Waylon Jennings.  As Waylon’s drummer from the first Chet Atkins produced album, to the last one, Never Say Die, Live from the Ryman Auditorium.  Along the way we hear about the Dukes of Hazard, Daisy and a musical admission of guilt — for a fan base that’s still out there listening to the outlaw.

Episode 7 – Ricky Ray A Tree Becomes a Guitar

If you listened to Episode 6 you already heard how Ricky Ray came to music and came to Nashville from the Muscle Shoals area of Alabama. He tells us what he knows about the trees that become guitars and the guitars that become priceless classics of sound reproduction, and a guitar he bought for his friend from the same tree as Trigger. They end the episode by singing Ricky’s song old guitar.

Episode 6 – Ricky Ray – Granny’s Angels

 

Ricky Ray is an accomplished musician, living, writing, producing, and thriving in the music industry in Nashville, Tennessee. His first fuzzy memory is a guitar on his granny’s lap, being played slide with a butter knife.

Forty years ago he drove his red 1966 pickup truck from Alabama to Centennial Park in Nashville. Initially, that was his Continue reading “Episode 6 – Ricky Ray – Granny’s Angels”

Episode 5 – Carl Perkins

Carl Perkins initially let Jay Perkins of The Perkins Brothers do most of the singing.  Carl played lead guitar for the Perkins Brothers Band which, as Carl explains to us in our interview for Music Path, is difficult to do while singing lead himself.  He tells us about being married to a woman who knew a good song when she heard it.  Carl gives some insight into writing “feel good music”.

The Perkins Brothers

Continue reading “Episode 5 – Carl Perkins”

Episode 4 – Sonny Throckmorton

James Fron “Sonny” Throckmorton is an American country music singer songwriter who grew up in Texas.  When he came to Nashville and signed with Tree Publishing (Sony ATV), he was fired after none of his songs became hits.

He returned to Texas, leaving his catalog of songs and demos behind, but within 9 months, 170 of this songs were recorded, were hits and he was rehired by Tree. Continue reading “Episode 4 – Sonny Throckmorton”

Episode 3 – Sonny Boy Williamson

 

John Lee Curtis “Sonny Boy” Williamson grew up in Jackson, TN. He introduced the harmonica as a solo instrument for blues performers and electrified its sound with a $200 public address amplifier.  Billy Boy Arnold met Sonny Boy and asked him to teach him to play the harmonica.  Before Sonny Boy was killed in Chicago, he taught the eleven year old Bill Boy to play, bending notes and inhaling through the instrument to provide breath to sing and play simultaneously.  Billy Boy relates his memories his visits to Sonny Boy’s house and beginning a life-long career and a blues harmonica player himself.  Continue reading “Episode 3 – Sonny Boy Williamson”

Episode 2 – Bruce Channel – Hey Baby!

In 1962 it was unusual to have an international hit record.  It was the early stirrings of rock music, and a record named “Hey Baby” rolled out the red carpet for Bruce Channel and Delbert McClinton as the concert headliners in London.  Bruce and Delbert shared a dressing room with their warm up act, a talented cover band getting started: John, Paul, George, and Pete.  The Beatles, a year before adding Ringo.  Continue reading “Episode 2 – Bruce Channel – Hey Baby!”

Episode 1 – Rolling Stones Sax Man

Music Path is a podcast about music, and some of the places, in the U.S., where it was conceived and performed, where inspiration and life collided to generate blues, bluegrass, country, gospel, soul, rockabilly and rock and roll at the crossroads of American History and renowned scenic beauty.

Whether you’re interested in Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana or Tennessee, states that make up the Americana Music Triangle, or the Tennessee Music Pathway, you’ll hear about cool places you’ll want to visit.

Music Path on an individual level is also about writing, performing and getting your music heard. If you love music, but don’t create it, you’ll hear from musicians who do, about life on the road and in the studio and some of the things that make them laugh or sigh.

So put your tray tables in their upright and locked position. This is Music Path. Continue reading “Episode 1 – Rolling Stones Sax Man”